Sports Physicals Available at UNI

Back-to-school is right around the corner, and some fall sports start even sooner!  At UNI we can take care of your child’s sports physical so they can get back on the practice field ASAP!

What Is a Sports Physical?
In the sports medicine field, the sports physical exam is known as a preparticipation physical examination (PPE). The exam helps determine whether it’s safe for you to participate in a certain sport. Most states actually require that kids and teens have a sports physical before they can start a new sport or begin a new competitive season. But even if a sports physical isn’t required, doctors still highly recommend getting one.

The two main parts to a sports physical are the medical history and the physical exam.

Medical History
This part of the exam includes questions about:

  • serious illnesses among family members
  • illnesses that you had when you were younger or may have now, such as asthma, diabetes, or epilepsy
  • previous hospitalizations or surgeries
  • allergies (to insect bites, for example)
  • past injuries (including concussions, sprains, or bone fractures)
  • whether you’ve ever passed out, felt dizzy, had chest pain, or had trouble breathing during exercise
  • any medications that you are on (including over-the-counter medications, herbal supplements, and prescription medications)
  • The medical history questions are usually on a form that you can bring home, so ask your parents to help you fill in the answers. If possible, ask both parents about family medical history.


Physical Examination
During the physical part of the exam, the doctor will:

  • record your height and weight
  • take a blood pressure and pulse (heart rate and rhythm)
    test your vision
  • check your heart, lungs, abdomen, ears, nose, and throat
  • evaluate your posture, joints, strength, and flexibility

 

A doctor will also ask questions about use of drugs, alcohol, or dietary supplements, including steroids or other “performance enhancers” and weight-loss supplements, because these can affect a person’s health.

At the end of your exam, the doctor will either fill out and sign a form if everything checks out OK or, in some cases, recommend a follow-up exam, additional tests, or specific treatment for medical problems.

 

Information from kidshealth.org was used in this post.
This information is not a substitute for medical advice nor is it intended as such. If you have questions about your health please contact your primary care physician, our offices, or 911 in case of an emergency.